Contact lenses in winter

There are lots of reasons why it’s worth wearing contact lenses, especially in winter. One is the well-known problem of fogged spectacles when you enter a heated room from outdoors. With contact lenses, this problem is a thing of the past. But don't lenses react to the cold like spectacle lenses?

Can contact lenses freeze?

It depends. When you’ve got them in: no. They assume the temperature of your body, so they can’t freeze while you’re wearing them – even in sub-zero temperatures. So in that respect, there’s nothing to worry about.

It’s different if your lenses are subjected to temperatures below -15°C for an extended period, e.g. by being left in the car overnight: then the saline solution they’re stored in freezes. But even this won’t damage them: simply let them thaw out at room temperature and you can reuse them as normal.

Care products, by contrast, should be protected from temperatures below -10°C for prolonged periods, as this can impair their technical and disinfecting properties. If you travel with a care product, keep it in your hand luggage so it’s always to hand. A little tip: many brands sell mini portions (max. 100 ml) that are suitable for air travel.

Do lenses dry my eyes out?

The simple answer is no, contact lenses don’t dry your eyes out. That said, many people struggle with dry eyes in winter, whether they wear lenses or not. 

This has to do with the heated air in our homes and the fact that cold temperatures are low in humidity. And there’s no doubting that lenses can feel uncomfortable on dry eyes. That’s why we recommend using moisturising eye drops like Hylo Dual, Comfort Drops or Systane Hydration, especially in winter. Doing so significantly improves comfort and allows you to take full advantage of your lenses!

What makes contact lenses so practical in winter?

Many people who wear glasses would agree that lenses are more practical in certain situations, such as when doing sports. But why would that be the case in winter?

In a word: snow sports. If you’re one for hitting the slopes in winter, you probably know how difficult it is to wear prescription glasses under your ski helmet and goggles. Not only can this be very uncomfortable – depending on the helmet, it’s also simply impossible in terms of space. So contact lenses are the perfect addition to your kit if you’re a skier or snowboarder.

But what if the latter aren’t your thing and you’re more likely to be found snowshoeing, walking or on lounging on the terrace? It’s still important to protect your eyes from the reflective UV rays. With contact lenses, you don’t need expensive prescription sunglasses – simply some cheap, non prescription ones (especially if you don’t have to splash out on a ski pass